March of the Titans (45)

The following passage of chapter 45 of March of the Titans: A History of the White Race by Arthur Kemp caught my attention:


Race War in the Far East

Portuguese explorers were the first Whites to arrive by sea in China, landing in 1514. By 1557, they had acquired a trading station at Macau and by 1570, trade began between China and Spanish settlements in the Philippines. In 1619, the Dutch settled in Taiwan and took possession of the nearby P’enghu Islands (Pescadores). Soon Jesuit missionaries arrived in China from Europe but failed utterly in their attempts to convert the Chinese who rejected the Christian religion with scorn.

After recounting how the Quing dynasty tried to impede white settlements, Kemp describes the British wars in China, including the Opium wars. In my humble opinion, the worst blunder that the whites committed in Asia was allowing the empowerment of these high-IQ peoples, because, as Kemp writes:

By the end of the 20th Century, both Japan and China had developed into industrial giants, responsible for the production, if not invention, of the majority of day-to-day appliances and convenience goods used all over the world.

Both nations are also marked in their desire to retain their racial homogeneity, and do not tolerate mass Third World immigration into their lands, unlike the White Western nations. This policy is also applied to refugees: Japan for example, refused to take Vietnamese Boat People refugees unless they were racially compatible with the existing Japanese population: if not, they were turned away.

This strict, racially-based immigration policy, is both Japan and China’s formula for long term survival and progress, and, if maintained, will ensure that they escape the fate of Western nations who have abandoned such policies.

Published in: on January 13, 2013 at 7:22 pm  Leave a Comment  

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