March of the Titans (34)

Excerpted from chapter 34 of March of the Titans: A History of the White Race by Arthur Kemp:


The test of ethnicity – Switzerland, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia

In the first chapter of this book, the difference between race and ethnicity was discussed. “Race” is a collection of individuals sharing a common genetic base; while “ethnicity” refers to the actual cultural manifestations of a particular group of people. Ethnicity is easily transferable amongst members of the same race—only when there are significant racial differences amongst the transferring societies, does the process falter.

The truth of this is perfectly illustrated in the comparative histories of three nations where ethnic conflict has played a major role: Switzerland, the Czech and Slovak Republics, and the former state of Yugoslavia. Switzerland, which retained the highest degree of racial homogeneity, overcame its ethnically based differences with relative ease.

The other two nations—Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia, were however less racially homogeneous than Switzerland, and each therefore dissolved after conflicts, the intensity and length of which were inversely proportional to their homogeneity. The rule is that the higher the racial homogeneity, the more likely there is to be peace amongst racially similar ethnic groupings—the lower the racial homogeneity, the higher the discordance.

In this way the Czechs and the Slovaks entered a period of peace after the German minority were forcibly expelled after 1945, and finally they divided their country peacefully in the 1990s. However the far less racially homogeneous Yugoslavia collapsed into frightful civil war before physical division produced any measure of peace.

[After discussing the history of Switzerland, which had not succumbed to non-white immigration until very recently, Kemp writes about the Czech and Slovak republics:]

The continual occupation of the various regions led to the establishment of defined ethnic groupings—the majority being in sub-racial terms, White, but with a significant minority being of mixed Asiatic-White descent, along with a not inconsiderable overtly non-White “Gypsy” population—who numbered some 500,000 in 1992—being descendants of Indians who entered southern Europe at the time of the great Asiatic invasions and who remained biologically isolated from mainstream society.

Each of these White cultural groupings became associated with the various major players in the region: Germans, Austrians, Slavs, with a mix of Slavic and German producing a new ethnic grouping, the Czechs. These territories—Bohemia, Moravia, part of Silesia, Slovakia, and sub-Carpathian Ruthenia, all eventually fell under the control of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Neither the Czech nor Slovakians have ever encouraged immigration from anywhere, and as such, still retain an high degree of racial homogeneity, if the part of the population which shows slight Asiatic ancestry is excluded. The dominant sub-racial types remain therefore Slavic, a combination of Nordic and Alpine sub-racial types.


Ethnic and racial stew, caused by non-white Ottoman occupation

The state of Yugoslavia was created at the end of the 19th Century out of a number of ethnic cultural groupings in the Balkans. The volatile mix of White Slavic, Asiatic invaders and Islamic Turks in the Ottoman Empire have fused—and often clashed violently—to make this region one of the most unstable in all of Europe, with its wars still dominating Europe at the end of the 20th Century.

Yugoslavia was created out of a number of smaller territories, some of which were independent of the foreign invaders in Eastern Europe, and some of whom were not.

Before the progress of the actual state of Yugoslavia is overviewed, it is therefore crucial to briefly review its main component regions: Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, and Slovenia.

The conflicts in the former Yugoslav republic have ensured that the region has not been targeted by any legal or illegal immigration, and so the region retains much of its original population make-up.

However, a significant part of the population shows definite traces of the hundreds of years of non-White Turkish Ottoman occupation left from the time before the creation of the Yugoslav state. This admixture is culturally reflected in the fact that a large proportion of the population are in fact Muslims and not Christians—in real terms this means that as much as 20 per cent of the population may originally be of mixed ancestry to one degree or another, with the notable exception of the Croatians (who remain predominantly Nordic/Alpine sub-racial stock).


A comparison

When comparing the Swiss, Czechoslovakian and Yugoslavian approaches to settling ethnic conflict, the importance of race is once again brought to the fore. Switzerland and Czechoslovakia, both being almost racially homogeneous, but ethnically divided, have managed to settle their differences constitutionally; while Yugoslavians, divided ethnically and racially, have been forced to carve out their living areas through violent conflict.

Published in: on January 13, 2013 at 9:22 pm  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://cienciologia.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/march-of-the-titans-34/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: