March of the Titans (12)

Excerpted from chapter 12 of March of the Titans: A History of the White Race by Arthur Kemp:


The age of the Caesars:
pre-Christian Rome

The Italian peninsula had originally been settled by a Proto-Nordic/Alpine Mediterranean White racial mix during the Neolithic age, with the Alpine and Mediterranean elements being in the majority.

From around 2000 BC, Indo-European migrants from central Europe (and originally from southern Russia) settled in northern Italy, crossing the Alps from present day Austria and Hungary. Amongst these people were Celtic tribesmen known as the Latini. Racially speaking, these tribesmen were predominantly Nordic in nature. Another group of Whites, known as the Etruscans, also settled in Italy by the year 800 BC.

[Of this chapter I will omit what we have read in the common histories of Rome and stick to racial matters and how attempts to increase the white roman population failed, and how Rome’s fate was sealed with Caracalla and the edict of 212 AD.]

As early as 131 BC, the Roman censor, Melletus, had called for a law compelling Roman citizens to marry—Caesar, Augustus, Nero and Trajan all offered prizes for Roman citizens having more than four children.

It is interesting to note that the original Indo-European descended Romans viewed anyone who was dark with suspicion. The Roman proverb “hic niger es, hunc tu, Romane, caveato” (He is black, beware of him, Roman) is recorded by Horace as being a common saying amongst Romans of the time. (Sat., i. 4, 85).

This is not to say that the Romans of the Late Republic or of the Pax Romana resisted the physical integration process. On the contrary, they seemed to have welcomed it as an essential part of Empire building and as a means to keep subdued populations under control.

It is unlikely though that they could have foreseen the long term consequences it would create. When the last of the true Romans were bred out in the vast reaches of the Empire, so did the original spark which had created the Empire in the first place. Hence there are today only Roman ruins in Africa, the Near and Middle East, and indeed even in Rome today—silent monuments to a people long gone.

Blond Romans in southern Italy:
Primavera, wall painting from Stabiae,
1st Century AD, National Museum, Naples

In 212 AD, in an apparent attempt to broaden the Roman tax base, Caracalla passed an edict giving all free males within the Empire citizenship of Rome.

This proclamation, which effectively turned centuries of Roman law on its head (previously Roman law had always sought to prevent Roman citizenship passing to those outside of Rome), had effects far greater than just broadening the tax base.

Early Roman law had made provisions for the maintenance of racial homogeneity amongst its citizens, by stipulating that persons could only be citizens of Rome if both their parents were Roman citizens themselves.

While the early Romans placed great emphasis on maintaining their racial homogeneity, by the first century AD, the idea of universality had become an undercurrent: it was to become the main train of thought by the second century AD, and is directly linked to the rise of Christianity, which has the world-view of the universality of man as its underlying creed.

By the time of Caracalla’s edict, the sheer size of the empire and the fact that it had already included so many racially alien elements within its borders, had made a large amount of racial mixing inevitable—Caracalla’s edict gave legal support to this process. Interracial marriages and mixed race children became more and more common after this, and slowly but surely, Rome and the Roman Empire in the Mediterranean lost its majority White leadership core.

Thus the fate which had befallen all the other great civilizations, namely the disappearance of the people who created those civilizations through physical integration, crept up on Rome itself.

Although this change in racial demographics was not as marked in Rome itself as in the easternmost outreaches of the Empire, it was however dramatic enough to change the very nature of the civilization.

Foreigners from all over the already mixed race Middle East poured into Rome, attracted by its wealth and status. Being granted citizenship, these foreigners were steadily absorbed into the Roman population, to the point where today only a very few Italians can still today claim pure Roman descent.

Huge swathes of the southern part of Italy and Sicily are today clearly non-White, being mainly a mixture of Arabic and White, while in scattered places there are flashes of the original population, light skins, light eyes or light hair—as there are right across the Mediterranean and as far afield as Iran or India.

The path followed by Rome mirrored that followed by Sumeria, the Near East, Egypt and Greece. All these civilizations remained intact as long as the society which created them remained homogeneous.

As soon as these societies lost their homogeneity and became multiracial, the very nature of the societies changed and the original civilizations disappeared. Rome would prove to be no exception to this rule.

Published in: on January 13, 2013 at 11:18 pm  Leave a Comment  

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